For many people, ScootPad is an at-home platform to extend learning in school. I use it this way at our house, with my own children. My son has been doing ScootPad for years, when none of his teachers even knew about it! Since I’ve returned to the classroom, I’ve brought the power of ScootPad with me.

While I use it as an at-home platform to extend learning for my own students, I am a GT teacher in a high poverty school where a number of families don’t have internet access at home. I’ve learned to implement ScootPad in many other ways.

1. Make your room available–I make my room available before school and at lunch for kids who want to come in and work. I talk to their homeroom teachers to get them permission to do ScootPad after finishing their required work.

2. Use ScootPad as a direct tool–When I use ScootPad during my students’ GT time, it takes many forms. Sometimes it’s a warm up, after 5-7 minutes, the kids save their work and we move on. I love that all their progress is saved so that kids can work at their own rate, and my class is not held hostage to let the last ones “finish” while the quicker kids sit there waiting.

3. Explore ScootPad for the day–I might be with a few kids, giving mini lessons for areas of struggle. I might have kids investigate their learning paths and what areas of a topic are harder or easier for them. I’ve even taken whole days for kids to find friends, do shoutouts, and adjust their avatar.

The goal is simply to help them build confidence with the platform and  feel successful, as this actually increases the amount of time outside my class they spend on ScootPad practices.

Although I feel I’ve done a relatively good job of introducing and maintaining ScootPad across the year, I am very mindful of the limited time I have with my kids, and I want to be sure I am maximizing every moment.  Thus, I am always revisiting my strategies to emphasize the program in balance with all the other things we do in my class.

I’d love ideas on how you use ScootPad in class, and how you might suggest I adapt or adjust the ways I do! 🙂

Cheers!

Dr. Michelle Anthony